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Viewing entries posted in March 2011

28
Mar
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James Attlee On Darkness

'I believe men are still generally a little afraid of the dark,' wrote Thoreau in Walden, 'although the witches are all hung and Christianity and candles have been introduced.' Mankind's ongoing project to banish any remaining crepuscular corners from the earth has made astonishing progress...
Posted by James Attlee
24
Mar
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Jules Evans On Teaching The Good Life

Just over a decade ago, the government decided that emotional well-being should be taught in British schools. The initiative was part of the Every Child Matters policy shift in 2003, which was dogged from the start by a bureaucratic obsession with acronyms: ECM declared,...
Posted by Jules Evans
23
Mar
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How The Cure Is All In Your Mindfulness

Stress has a huge impact on our society. Mental health problems cost the British economy around 100 billion a year, and seven million UK adults are so tense they'd qualify for a diagnosis of anxiety disorder. Many of the physical ailments that overwhelm our...
Posted by Ed Halliwell and Jonty Heaversedge
21
Mar
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Julian Baggini on Learning the Ego Trick

When Rene Descartes tried to systematically doubt everything he believed, he succeeded until it came to his own existence. The very act of questioning whether you exist proves you do, because you must be there for the doubt to be entertained in the first...
Posted by Julian Baggini
18
Mar
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The Two Approaches to Well-Being

According to the Tao Te Ching, the universe is ruled by two principles: an active principle (Yang) and a passive principle (Yin). Perhaps there are also two forms of well-being: active and passive. The active form of well-being lies in the happiness of pursuit,...
Posted by Jules Evans
17
Mar
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Tom Chatfield on Living with Technology

There are many ways of living with something. To live with cares and troubles means ensuring they do not overwhelm the rest of life. To live with friends and loved ones means, hopefully, to cherish them. To live with disability entails a delicate, perpetual...
Posted by Tom Chatfield
16
Mar
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Mark Vernon on Hope

What is hope? In his autobiography, Miracles of Life, the writer J.G. Ballard offers an arresting case in point, which I think gets to the heart of the matter. He tells of the apparently most hopeless moment in his life. He, his wife and...
Posted by Mark Vernon
14
Mar
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Alain de Botton on Tsunamis and Stoicism

Early in the morning on the fifth of February AD 62, a gigantic earthquake rippled beneath the Roman province of Campania and in seconds, killed thousands of unsuspecting inhabitants. Large sections of Pompeii collapsed on top of people in their beds. Attempts to rescue...
Posted by Alain de Botton
10
Mar
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Jules Evans On How Self-Help Saved Philosophy

In the last 20 years or so, after a two-thousand-year hiatus, philosophy has got back into the business of self-help. I say 'back into' it, because when philosophy was first invented, that was what it was: self-help. Socrates, Epicurus, the Stoics, Sceptics, Cynics and...
Posted by Jules Evans
09
Mar
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John Lidwell Durnin on DIY Speakers

The human ear will always twitch to attention at the promise of being saved. It is a pragmatic organ, distrustful of our ability to cope on our own, always eager for outside advice. If you are like most people, your ear will occasionally...
Posted by John Lidwell Durnin
08
Mar
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Susan Pinker on Women and Skewed Self-Perception

Know thyself, Plato instructed us 2,500 years ago. Most of us don't, of course, and women are experts at a certain type of self-deception. Decades of studies show that women are more likely than men to underestimate their influence, and this mismatch between how...
Posted by Susan Pinker

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